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Do You Understand This Dialogue?

Do You Understand This Dialogue?

Date: Feb 15 2011

Topic: Idioms and Slang

Author: englishteacher24/7

Lesson

Two older men greeted each other, one says to the other, "how's it going young man?  The other man said, "heavy on the young!"

Do you understand what the second man meant by "heavy on the young?"

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englishteacher24/7

United States

Welcome back, Claudio. The explanation for the “Heavy on the young”phrase was posted on August 30, 2017, please scroll back to that date for the answer.


In addition, I invite you to learn Lesson No. 91 posted on December 25, 2017 and the explanation was posted on December 31, 2018.


I hope 2018 will be a good year for learning English.

03:51 PM Jan 04 2018 |

Cláudio

Cláudio

Brazil

Hi, Mr. Gray.


I can only guess what the second man was saying, but I cannot say I completely understood it. It’s perhaps something like: “not so young” ?


I’m looking forward to your explanation.


Happy New Year!


Thanks.

02:11 AM Jan 02 2018 |

englishteacher24/7

United States

Lesson No. 91 – Authentic Conversational English Explanation has been posted.

12:58 AM Jan 02 2018 |

englishteacher24/7

United States

Lesson No. 91 – Authentic Conversational English Explanation:


The paraphrase is written under the original conversation and in italics.


Wife to husband: I’ve been asking you since Columbus sailed to fix the door leak, how many moons is it going to take?


Wife to husband: I’ve been asking you for a very long time to fix the door leak, how much more time is it going to take?


The phrase ”since Columbus sailed” is hyperbole (an exaggeration) for a very long time.


The idiom “many moons” originated with the American Indians with ”moons” meaning “months”therefore, “many moons” literally means many months which translate into a ”long time.”


Husband: Keep hope alive. In due time dear, in due time.


Husband: Don’t quit hoping. At the appropriate time dear, at the appropriate time [implied that he’ll eventually fix the door leak.]


Wife: I got your in due time. In due time you’re gonna be in the dog house.


Wife: I’ll tell you about your “appropriate time.” At the appropriate time you’re gonna be out of the house (humorously she’s telling him she’s going to kick him out of the house that he will sleep in the dog house).


Husband: Now, now dear. Let’s not elevate your request to being in your dreams.


Husband: Calm down dear. Don’t push me to the point where your door leak request will be a dream!


Wife: Speaking of dreams, what part of nightmare don’t you understand?


Wife: Now that you mentioned dreams, how about a nightmare coming your way!


Husband: Are you going to go there?


Husband: Are you thinking about going that far?


[To “go there” means to go into an area of thought that you want to avoid.]


Wife: I’m already there if you don’t fix the door leak ASAP. Hook me up.


Wife: I’ve already decided that you’re going into the doghouse if you don’t fix the door leak ASoon APossible (ASAP). Do it now!


“Hook me up” is slang for doing a favor for someone.


Husband: A woman’s work is from sun up to sundown but a man’s work is never done!


Husband: A woman’s work has a time limit and ends at sundown but a man is always working!


Wife: Yeah, right. But we know what’s up, ha, ha!


Wife: Yes, I know you think your proverb is right, but we both know the truth, ha, ha!


Answers to the questions:


No. 1-3 questions were answered by you and the paraphrase (re-write).


4. Why did the wife laugh in her last statement which was in response to her husband’s previous statement?


Answer: His wife laughed because her husband changed the subject in a well-known proverb that says “a man’s work is from sun up to sundown but a woman’s work is never done.”


In other words, the husband is saying a man’s work is never done which is the opposite of a woman’s work is never done. He applied the proverb to himself.


Final Words


In Conversational English there may be idioms, phrases, phrasal verbs, slang words, contractions, cliches, and abbreviations combined with Standard English. But don’t worry, it’s not as difficult as it may seem.


The key is to expose yourself to this information on a regular basis, become a good listener/observer, seek answers to your questions and speak at every opportunity.


Amira, your updated paraphrase is even closer to the actual meaning and your diligent efforts are paying off.


Additional Assignment


If you’d like, go through the lesson and identify any slang words, idioms, contractions, and abbreviation. 


01:30 AM Dec 31 2017 |

englishteacher24/7

United States

Amira, you’ve done a fantastic job of answering the questions in the lesson. I’ll take a few days to give others an opportunity to submit their answers before I write my explanation of the lesson.

07:11 PM Dec 27 2017 |

La Princesse de la vie

Egypt

updated


Hello, Mr. Alston!


It’s been a while. I’ve been really waiting for this since 13th of the month xD


I think I get most of the conversation. It gave me a very clear and helpful idea about what verbal sparring is.


My paraphrase:


Wife to husband: I’ve been asking you since very long time to fix the door leak, how much more time is it going to take?



Husband: Keep hope alive. In due time dear, in due time.



Wife: I got your due time. In due time you’re gonna be out of the house (humourously she’s telling him she’s going to kick him out of the house that he will sleep in the dog house).



Husband: Now, now dear. Let’s not elevate your request to being a wish (he’s threating her here that if she keeps pushing him he might not do it at all).



Wife: Speaking of dreams, what part of nightmare don’t you understand?



Husband: Are you going to get this more comlicated?



Wife: I’m already there if you don’t fix the door leak ASAP. Hook me up (You’ll see what I’m going to do).



Husband: A woman’s work is from sun up to sun down and a man’s work is never done!



 Wife: Yea, right. But we know what’s up (That’s not the case here), ha, ha! (I think her husband is not the man whose work is never done, he seems to be free most of the time, that’s why she’s laughing I think, because he’s stating a fact that’s not in him)


I’m not quite sure about the last two lines. Waiting for your review Mr. Alston.

12:33 PM Dec 26 2017 |

englishteacher24/7

United States

Lesson No. 91 – Authentic Conversational English:


A husband and wife are engaging in some light “verbal sparring” during a day in their lives. “Verbal sparring” is engaging in a sort of verbal combat (for lack of a better word.) It can range from debating, argumentation, contention, joking, or playing the dozens. In this lesson, a husband and wife are joking with each other in their verbal sparring. 


Read the conversation in the lesson and see if you can understand it.


Wife to husband: I’ve been asking you since Columbus sailed to fix the door leak, how many moons is it going to take?


Husband: Keep hope alive. In due time dear, in due time.


Wife: I got your due time. In due time you’re gonna be in the dog house.


Husband: Now, now dear. Let’s not elevate your request to being in your dreams.


Wife: Speaking of dreams, what part of nightmare don’t you understand?


Husband: Are you going to go there?


Wife: I’m already there if you don’t fix the door leak ASAP. Hook me up.


Husband: A woman’s work is from sun up to sun down and a man’s work is never done!


 Wife: Yea, right. But we know what’s up, ha, ha!


Questions:


1. Do you understand the meaning of this dialogue between the husband and wife?


2. Do you know the meaning of the words in bold type?


3. Can you re-write this dialogue (paraphrase)?


4. Why did the wife laugh in her last statement?


5. Do you now understand about verbal sparring and its various forms?

10:50 PM Dec 25 2017 |

englishteacher24/7

United States

New lesson update. My next lesson on Conversational English is coming. Thank you for your patience during this holiday season.

05:57 PM Dec 25 2017 |

englishteacher24/7

United States

Neginb, thanks for your feedback and sincere accolades. You don’t have to wish to be in my classes in the USA because my “classes” are on Englishbaby.


Concerning your request about taking the IELTS exam, don’t worry, it’s easy.


English tests are for the purpose of determining if you can understand everyday English and communicate on this level. Therefore the goal is to answer the questions presented and not to memorize a set of answers.


You would benefit from someone who knows English to proofread your writing and coach you concerning any errors. If you don’t have anyone to do this, if you send me a short story of about 100 words on any general topic I’ll do it for you.


Here is a link that will help you http://www.dcielts.com/ielts-tips/8-ways-to-pass-ielts/


Judging from your written English you already are very good at writing English.


Also, a grammar checker is a very helpful tool to help eliminate errors.


Here’s a link to a free grammar checker https://www.grammarly.com/ 


The main thing is to relax and brush up (review) on your Basic English and stay away from deep grammar, basic grammar is all you need.


I wish you well in your endeavors.

06:26 PM Oct 15 2017 |

neginb

neginb

Iran, Islamic Republic Of

Thanks for these great lessons. I love the way you reply the students. You are a really good teacher. I wish I could be in USA to participate in your English classes.


To be honest, Now adays I am preparing myself to take an IELTS exam. I don’t have a lot of information about it but I have started to study some books. I will be thankful if you share your experinces and the most important points about it as a message to me.

11:09 AM Oct 13 2017 |

englishteacher24/7

United States

Lesson No. 90 Homonyms Explanation:


Easypeasy, you offered a superb in-depth explanation of “Homonyms” describing that there are two kinds coupled with a good example. Thanks a bunch!


Some people may benefit by hearing the same thing another way, so for their sakes I’ll do so. 


“Homographs” are words that are spelled (spelt) and pronounced the same but has a totally different meaning such as the word Easypeasy used (bat).



“Homophone” words are pronounced the same but are spelled differently and have a totally different meaning which was the case in this lesson.


Lesson Explanation:


You may want to re-read Lesson No. 90 posted on September 16, 2017


Jan purchased some fabric at what she considered to be at a fantastic price which made it a “good buy.” Upon leaving the store she ran into the manager and complimented him by saying, “Good buy” because she was happy about her purchase.


In response to Jan’s comment the manager simply says “Goodby” as a good parting gesture.


The difference between “Good buy” and “Goodby” is only one letter (u) and both words are pronounced exactly the same. However, the meaning of “Good buy” is a statement of a good purchase and the meaning of “Goodby” is a farewell remark which can also be spelled “Good bye” with an “e”.


When two different words sound the same, context will determine their meanings.


If you have any questions concerning this lesson, please feel free to ask.

06:04 PM Sep 21 2017 |

easypeasy

easypeasy

Germany

What Jan meant by saying “good buy” was that she made a good purchasing because the product was exactly what she needed and she could buy it for a good price.


A homonym is when words seem to be the same, but mean different things. There are two kinds of homonyms: the homograph and the homophone.


The homograph is when the similiarity is visual. An example for a homograph is the word “bat”: it is only one word but when we read it we can think of a winged animal associated with vampires or a piece of sporting equipment used in baseball.


In our case we have a homophone. “Good buy” and “Goodbye” look different and mean something different, but when you hear it, it could be understood either as “good buy” or “goodbye”. The manager didn’t know that Jan made a “good buy” so he understood it as a “goodbye”. 





03:15 AM Sep 18 2017 |

englishteacher24/7

United States

Lesson No. 90 – Homonyms:


Jan went to a fabric store to buy some fabric to make a dress. She saw some fabric on the sale table that caught her eye. The fabric was just what she was looking for at a fantastic price, so she bought it.


After paying the cashier she proceeded to leave the store but ran into the store manager and she says to him, “Good buy” and the manager says to her, “Goodbye.”


Question:


Can you explain the meaning of Jan and the store manager’s short conversation? 

10:29 PM Sep 16 2017 |

englishteacher24/7

United States

Amira and Julito you both have expressed genuine concerns about balancing between not accommodating an unexpected visit from a non-family member and not offending the visitor. Here’s my take on it:


First, it makes it easier that the visitor is not a family member. It’s not so easy to say adios amigo to a family member unless it’s one of bay bay’s kids.


The key is to talk with them at the door and give a reasonable reason why you can’t invite them into your home. Here are a few examples:


1. “What a surprise to see you, what brings you to this part of town? Sorry I can’t invite you in, my wife is not dressed to receive company.”


2. “What’s up? I haven’t seen you since Columbus sailed! You caught me just as I was leaving out.”


3. “Man, you should have called me before you came, I would have prepared for your visit. Sorry I can’t invite you in.”


Julito, you are right on course to not give in to lying. You know how creative people can be in being a spin doctor.


Thanks for your contributions.


01:07 PM Sep 12 2017 |

julito1

julito1

Argentina

As to politely refuse an unexpected visit i wouldn`t know what to say . It could be that i might have a good excuse, then it is ok with me to decline , other than that,i am a bad lier , people will know that  they are not welcome and will leave with ill feeling towards me.Such is life.

01:52 PM Sep 11 2017 |

La Princesse de la vie

Egypt

I’m not sure about this one! I would just tell them that I have something important to do somewhere, but of course I would also express my sorrow that I couldn’t host them.


11:52 AM Sep 11 2017 |

englishteacher24/7

United States

A new question on how to politely refuse an unexpected visit has been posted.

08:00 PM Sep 10 2017 |

englishteacher24/7

United States

You’re welcome, Amira. Your paraphrases are more than appreciated, all of which are very accurate in meaning.


Now, here is an additional question for everyone.


Question:


How could you politely refuse to accommodate an unexpected or unwelcomed visit from a non-family member?

07:41 PM Sep 09 2017 |

La Princesse de la vie

Egypt

Mr. Alston, thanks a million for your reply :) 


I would like to paraphrase the rest of the informal exemples if that’s Ok.



“Hey Jill, look what the wind blew in!”


Hey Jill, look what the wind brought us “He’s joking that the wind brought him his friend at his door”


“Dude, don’t just stand there, come on it!”


Man, don’t stay out, come in.


“Man you look hungry, you’re just in time for dinner, come on in.”


Man you look hungry, you’re lucky it’s dinner time, come in.

12:30 PM Sep 08 2017 |

englishteacher24/7

United States

Amira, thanks for your feedback. I respect the fact that you’ll always ask if you don’t understand something. This is a big part of why you have progressed in your English knowledge.


For those who may just be joining us, Amira’s wants a clarification of one of my informal greetings from Lesson No. 89 Explanation dated September 5, 2017. You may want to read the whole lesson for a better understanding.


The informal greeting was: 


“Well, well, well, if it ain’t the Midnight Rider, come on in to the crib, man.”


Let’s examine this informal greeting:


1. When Bill started by saying, “Well, well, well…” it sets the tone for a very informal greeting which it is apparent that they were close friends who apparently haven’t seen each other in awhile.


2. He (Bill) goes on to say, “If it ain’t the Midnight Rider…” which means he is labeling his unexpected guess a “Midnight Rider.” The name “Midnight Rider” is the name of a song from the American country rock group “The Allman Brothers Band” which is about a “man on the run” apparently from the law (police). Bill called his friend the “Midnight Rider” as a joke.


3. Finally, Bill says to his “Midnight Rider” friend, “come on in to the crib man.” The word “crib” is slang for your home; therefore, Bill was inviting his unexpected guest into his home. He ends it with “man” which in this case is slang for friend.


Summary


To say what Bill said another way (paraphrase) would be:


“Hello, hello, hello, my running away from something friend, come on into my home.”


Final thought:


I worded that informal greeting to encourage questions about the meaning of it. Amira was the only one to ask about it. I’d like to suggest to other readers to develop an inquisitive mind about English and don’t just ignore what you don’t understand.


Take the initiative to find out what you don’t know; otherwise you are likely to miss many opportunities to increase your knowledge of English.


Welcome, Oscar guy. Yes, you can add me.



08:24 PM Sep 07 2017 |

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