Being Thrifty

Being Thrifty

Mar 27 2017

Intro

What does being thrifty mean? If you go on a shopping spree at the mall every weekend, you’re not being thrifty. If you buy only the most expensive brands, you’re not being thrifty. If you eat at restaurants instead of buying groceries, you’re not being thrifty. Being thrifty means being smart with your money.

You might want to save money for school, for a car, or for your rainy day fund. To do this, you will need to pinch pennies and be thrifty. Buy used clothes instead of new clothes. Cook meals at home. Take the bus instead of a taxi. It’s not always fun, but being thrifty today can help you have a better life tomorrow.

Andy break the bank. Jessica has some ideas to help him be more thrifty. Listen to today’s English lesson to hear her ideas.

Dialogue

Andy_H: Ah, Jessica, I need your help!

Jessica:  What’s going on?

Andy_H:  So, I went to Whole Foods, and I splurged again. I don’t have any money left.

Jessica:  Oh, you have got to learn to pinch pennies. Go to thrift stores. Go to Winco. You can do a whole shopping spree, and you save so much money.

Andy_H:  Yeah, but all the stuff is gross.

Jessica:  I think it’s a lifestyle adjustment. Trust me on this. If you go and take your time, don’t go when you’re in a rush, and you read labels, you’ll recognize brands, and you’ll really get a great return on investment. I fill up an entire shopping cart of groceries, and I don’t even break the bank. It’s incredible.

Andy_H:  I guess I have a compulsive spending habit. Oh, man. I think I’m going to have to jump on the being thrifty train with you, because I’m about to open up my rainy day fund just to get some pasta.

Jessica:  You should come with me the next time I go.

Andy_H:  Can I?

Jessica:  I’ll call you, and I’ll show you how it’s done. You can learn to shop thrifty just like I do.

Andy_H:  OK.

Jessica:  Trust me, you’ll love it.

Andy_H:  OK

Discussion

Andy is a compulsive shopper. If he goes on a shopping spree, he’ll break the bank! He tells Jessica that he splurged at the grocery store and spent all his money. How can he change his habits? Jessica has a lot of good ideas for him.

Instead of splurging, Jessica likes to shop for used clothes and cheap groceries. By choosing brands that cost less, she can save money for her rainy day fund. Jessica is good at being thrifty. She’ll help Andy get a better return on investment when shopping.

Are you good at pinching pennies? Where do you buy groceries?

Grammar Point

The First Conditional

Jessica gives Andy some advice on how to be thrifty. She says, “If you go and take your time, don’t go when you’re in a rush, and you read labels, you’ll recognize brands, and you’ll really get a great return on investment.” Jessica uses the first conditional.

The first conditional is used to discuss things that will probably happen in the future as the result of something else that happens in the present.

The first conditional consists of two clauses, one with If + simple present verb and the second with simple future verb, as in, “If you do something bad, something bad will happen to you.”

Let’s look at Jessica’s sentence. “If you go and take your time, don’t go when you’re in a rush, and you read labels, you’ll recognize brands, and you’ll really get a great return on investment.” Although it’s very long, it still has two main clauses. The things Andy should do now are in the present tense (the if clause). The expected results are in the future tense (the result clause). When explaining ideas, people often make long sentences in the first conditional.

Which is correct, “You will save money if you turn the thermostat down,” or, “You save money if you will turn the thermostat down”?

Quiz

  1. What did Andy do at Whole Foods?

  2. What is NOT part of Jessica’s advice to Andy?

  3. Nike, Apple, and Whole Foods are all __.

  4. Which sentence is in the first conditional?


See the full English lesson at English, baby!