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Without tenses

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handwriter

handwriter

Norway

March 7, 2014

Many people say such things as, “those people or those groups that God hates…” I can’t say that I know the mind or thoughts of any god or gods, but I would think that “THE” god that I have heard mentioned here in these pages would be a God of Love—not hate.

I believe—it is my strong opinion—that we mortals tend to translate the thoughts and wills of others, such as religious documents or teachings, to fit our own agendas.  In that no one really has the “True” word of God as it may have been spoken from His lips, how can any one of us say for sure what or whom God does or does not hate—if He hates at all.  

I’m inclined to believe that “God” has no such emotion against those of whom He himself created.

I may have family or friends who may “go astray”, but I—I with all my weakness of being patient—I still care for and appreciate all my family and friends.

More entries: Half-Wit (3), Come Home Son, Life Is A Risk, Words Are Not Action, JOY, Here's a shot of me doing my one--and only one--yearly exercise (1), Indeed A Higher Law of Justice, Gotcha! (1), A Belated "I'm Sorry", The Fruits of Our Labor?

View all entries from Without tenses >

07:52 AM Mar 07 2014

handwriter

handwriter
Norway

So, yes, while it may be that we prefer being with some over others, it doesn’t mean to say that we love some and hate others—it just means that “some” make us feel more wanted, needed, and alive.

07:46 AM Mar 07 2014

handwriter

handwriter
Norway

"By three names is this mount known: The mountain of God, Mount Horeb and Mount Sinai. . . . Why The mountain of God? (Exodus 18:5). Because it was there that God manifested His Godhead. And Sinai? Because [it was on that mount] that God showed that He hates the angels and loves mankind." (Exodus Rabbah 51.8, Soncino edition) There is actually a Hebrew wordplay here, for Sinai sounds like the Hebrew for hate, although it begins with a different Hebrew letter and may mean 'thorny'. Similarly, Malachi speaks of God's preference for Jacob over Esau: "... yet I loved Jacob, and I hated Esau..." (Malachi 1:2-3)

But Esau, like Ishmael instead of Isaac, was not hated absolutely, only "rejected" as the Aramaic targum (paraphrase) prefers to render it. In Aramaicsanahcan mean 'to hate' and 'to separate', so the gospels could be saying separate yourselves from your parents if you want to follow me. This is a possible interpretation, but still against Jewish and biblical culture which is very supportive of family. Apart from Jesus' 'separating' and staying behind in the temple when he was younger he was a very dutiful son.

Again, I don’t believe that the words “hate” an “love”, as were used here, have the same meaning as we mortals tend to throw them around—using them at will—using them whenever we are too lazy or incompetent to express ourselves more “divinely”.