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Dorothee

Dorothee
Germany

Street Children In Nepal

Street Children In Nepal

-

May 13, 2010
2186 views

63 comments

Street Children (Eritrea)

Street Children (Eritrea)

May 13, 2010
1610 views

25 comments

Ethiopian Street Children

Ethiopian Street Children

May 13, 2010
2260 views

53 comments

Street Child In Senegal

Street Child In Senegal

May 14, 2010
1196 views

14 comments

Street Children (Malawi)

Street Children (Malawi)

May 15, 2010
1320 views

13 comments

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| 10:40 AM Mar 16 2018

Dorothee

Germany

>The German newspaper “Zeit” says that when a Bangladeshi plane crashed in Nepal some days ago at least 49 passengers died. Needless to say; most of them were Bangladeshi and Nepalese.
>The German journalist Diana Jervis now published an article about the most dangerous airports in the world…and one of them was located to Lukla in Nepal. If you ever wish to see Mount Everest however, you have no choice, but to head for this airport. The 527 meter short runway is one of the shortest in the world, making landing there extremely risky. Plus there is a lot of snow and ice and a lot of sharp rocks that are hard for the pilot not to hit.

| 05:04 AM Jan 28 2018

Dorothee

Germany

The German newspaper “Mitteldeutsche Zeitung” says that the university of Halle (Saxony/ Germany) just gave his graduation certificate to a Nepalese university student of medicine who had come to Halle to study medicine in Germany.
As he wants to specialize on cardiology he wants to stay a bit longer to get some practical experience. However he already bought a few acres in Nepal and has already concrete plans about building a cardiology-center there.
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Re-upload: “Domradio” says that according to the German aid-organisation “Apotheker ohne Grenzen Deutschland e.V.” says they are still working very hard to rebuild all the Nepalese buildings the earthquake of 2015 damaged. They were held back by the gasoline-prices of 2015 when gasoline transports were prevented from leaving India. As (almost) all of Nepal’s gasoline comes from India this influenced Nepal’s entire economy. Many things couldn’t be delivered or even produced as there was no fuel for the vehicles transporting these things. In extreme cases even food became rare as for example bakeries couldn’t be delivered with meal and animals couldn’t be transported to butcheries…Rare things usually are expensive, too and thus food, medicine and raw material to rebuild houses became very expensive. However “Apotheker ohne Grenzen Deutschland e.V.” states that as now Nepal again receives imports from India things slowly start to normalize.
Background: This organization seeks to give pharmaceutical support in emergencies like earthquakes, flooding, bush fires etc., but also does all it can do to ensure support with medicaments in poor areas and countries. You can even contact them if you’ve got medicine you don’t need anymore and if they find some use for them, they will take said pills etc.
If you want to donate and also have the money to donate, their donor-account is:
Donor-Account 0005077591
Deutsche Apotheker- und Ärztebank
BLZ 300 606 01
IBAN: DE 88 3006 0601 0005 0775 91
BIC DAAEDEDDXXX
...or you can contact them under the following e-mail if you’ve got some questions:
info@apotheker-ohne-grenzen.de
—-——-——
Re-upload: According to the website, where I found it, this photo shows street children in Nepal. If you want to know about an organisation that helps these disadvantaged children or if you even want to get involved, too, you should visit the following website: “http://www.cwsuk.org/projects_we_support/”.

| 10:08 AM Dec 22 2017

Dorothee

Germany

“GEA” says that a team of voluntary workers from the comparably small cities of Reutlingen and Kirchentellinsfurt who work for the aid-organisation “Hilfsverein mit Herz” now finished their one-year-long stay in Nepal.
What they achieved this year:
>Thanks to donations many visually impaired Nepalese patiens were given glasses and one hospital now can offer testings to find out what glasses which patient would need.
>One sonograph could be donated to a hospital and one worker was taught how to use it.
>One hospital was partially rebuilt.
>A heart-specialist could be sent to Nepal.
>The realization of a project to support the growth of cardamon in Nepal at least is in sight next year.
If you wish to support them, please donate to:
Donor-account: Volksbank Tübingen
Keyword: Nepalhilfe
IBAN: DE06 6406 1854 0064 4430 00

| 10:48 PM Oct 31 2017

Dorothee

Germany

Also this year the idea of “Trick or Treating For…” was a success. Already yesterday in the evening some organisations reported having received little donations.
The idea behind “Trick or Treating For…” is that on Halloween instead of asking for candy children ask for money they would give to this or that organisation.

| 10:41 AM Oct 27 2017

Dorothee

Germany

The latest episode of the German TV-show “360° – GEO Reportage” was about the Gurkha, warriors from the Nepapese Himalaya. Their fighting skills, mercilessness and endurance has always been reason for the British army to win some of these warriors for their army. Gurkha warriors even fought in both world wars for the Brits. Nepalese villages in the Himalaya gain financial profit from this interest in their warriors. The wages they receive for serving in the army are a lot more than what they would receive with most jobs in Nepal.
Most of those villagers who don’t take a chance like this will probably have to do hard physical work for the rest of their life, may some day end up malnourished and sickly as often they have nothing but cheap rice to eat, will have to force their children into child-labor instead of sending them to school…and probably there will be no way for them to provide for their aging parents someday. Also tuberculosis is a common cause of death due to the air conditions in this region.
This way however – by serving in the British army – they can give a lot of financial support to family and friends. Even retired Gurkha warriors profit from the British as they have a lot of experience and can tell good Gurkha warriors and mediocre ones apart. Often the British army paid them for giving their piece of advise and for judging the tests they put upon the Gurkha warriors the British army is going to hire.
However it should be added that many Gurkha warriors already died for the British army, leaving their wives and children behind as very poor orphans and widows. These warriors often are chosen for comparibly very dangerous jobs.

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