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prepositions--- how to handle them

trinityshiva

India

there are only two critical areas in english grammar [1]verbs and tenses [2] prepostions i see many on the forum asking questions about prepositions which is the easiest area when compared to verb tenses.  i have already dealt with the rules regarding the use of prepostions of time such as on/in/at.  with logical reasoning now to inculcate this logical sense of judgement in your young minds i want to discuss the use of the prepostions such as in/into/on/upon.

in case of these prepositions you shoud  ask yourself only two questions [1] is the subject in motion [2] or the subject at rest.

see the following sentences.  The cat is sleeping ___the cot. [ the subject is cat and it is sleeping so it is presumably resting so here we must use on [repeat] on.  let us see another sentence.  The cat jumped___me. [here also cat is the subject and it is jumping and that obvious that it is in motion so we use upon [repeat] upon

01:29 PM Nov 03 2007 |

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cherrye

cherrye

Philippines

Which is right?

I always hesitate which to use:

I saw him (in or at) the mall. (??) 

When do we use "in" instead of "at" and vice versa? 

02:17 AM Nov 04 2007 |

Pranav

Norfolk Island

with reference to your doubts about use of prepositions IN and AT. in my previous discussion i have discussed only the preposition in resepect of time but now what you are asking about is about the prepositions of place the rule states that WHEN YOU HAVE TWO GEOGRPHICAL AREAS IN THE SAME SENTENCE USE AT FOR SMALLER AREA AND IN FOR LARGER AREAS.eg I live at hyderabad in India. now hyderabad is a city smaller area when compared to india which is a country and obviously refers to the larger area.
Now with respect to your question at met him at the mall will be correct you should not use in because logically you are very precise where you met him and not vague.

04:29 AM Nov 04 2007 |

Pranav

Norfolk Island

with reference to your doubts about use of prepositions IN and AT. in my previous discussion i have discussed only the preposition in resepect of time but now what you are asking about is about the prepositions of place the rule states that WHEN YOU HAVE TWO GEOGRPHICAL AREAS IN THE SAME SENTENCE USE AT FOR SMALLER AREA AND IN FOR LARGER AREAS.eg I live at hyderabad in India. now hyderabad is a city smaller area when compared to india which is a country and obviously refers to the larger area.
Now with respect to your question at met him at the mall will be correct you should not use in because logically you are very precise where you met him and not vague.

04:29 AM Nov 04 2007 |

Pranav

Norfolk Island

with reference to your doubts about use of prepositions IN and AT. in my previous discussion i have discussed only the preposition in resepect of time but now what you are asking about is about the prepositions of place the rule states that WHEN YOU HAVE TWO GEOGRPHICAL AREAS IN THE SAME SENTENCE USE AT FOR SMALLER AREA AND IN FOR LARGER AREAS.eg I live at hyderabad in India. now hyderabad is a city smaller area when compared to india which is a country and obviously refers to the larger area.
Now with respect to your question at met him at the mall will be correct you should not use in because logically you are very precise where you met him and not vague.

04:29 AM Nov 04 2007 |

kochin

Trinidad and Tobago

Prepositions always give me problems in translating so I know this is difficult.

The cat is sleeping on the cot.

The cat jumped at me. 

12:41 AM Nov 05 2007 |

gkisseberth

Colombia

Sometimes in and on can be used in very similar situations, but with different meanings.

 If I say "My son is on his bed" it means he is on top of the bed

But "My son is in his bed" I more likely mean that he is under the blankets (think of being inside)

We say "Get on the bus", or "Get on the plane" but we "get in a taxi", or "get in a car" 

In these cases we usually use ON for bigger vehicles that are driven by someone else and IN for smaller vehicles, even though we are physically INSIDE all of them. 

 

02:22 AM Nov 05 2007 |

rimala

Malaysia

Hi!I'm Rimala…Can anyone help with this?

I went shopping to the mall.

I went shopping at the mall.

Which one of these is right? Thank you

02:13 PM Aug 29 2009 |