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Stress and Intonation

britdam007

britdam007

India

“It doesn’t have to be this way!” .  In this sentence to convey the meaning of it which word group should we stress? ( is it “doesn’t” or “have to be”?) Or, does the sentence carry different meaning in each case? Please advise?



Best regards,


Abhishek

08:09 AM Nov 21 2015 |

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Teacher AmySuper Member!

United States

It carries slightly different meanings depending on the stress of the words. For example, let’s pretend this was the conversation:


Person A: “We must leave at 8pm to get to the theater on time!”


Person B: “It doesn’t have to be this way!”


If Person B stresses the word “doesn’t,” she’s saying that Person A is totally wrong. If Person B stresses “have to be,” she’s saying that Person A could be wrong, and it might bepossible to leave earlier or later and still reach the theater in time.


I hope this helps!


Best,


Amy

06:32 PM Nov 21 2015 |

britdam007

britdam007

India

Thank you very much Teacher Amy! You have a wonderful day.

08:02 AM Nov 22 2015 |

britdam007

britdam007

India

I’d like to know here that what if I stressed the word group ‘this way” in that sentence? What would the meaning be then?



Best regards,


Abhishek

07:09 AM Nov 23 2015 |

Teacher AmySuper Member!

United States

Hi, 



In this case, you suggest that there is another way. In other words, it doesn’t have to be this way; it could be that way instead. It is similar to stressing “have to be,” and most English speakers will stress “have to be” instead of stressing “this way.”



Best,



Amy

11:39 PM Nov 24 2015 |

britdam007

britdam007

India

And when you stress ‘have to be’ the pronunciation of the word ‘have’ becomes həv or hæv?  Please advise? Do you actually stress the ‘have’ or the “be’ to suggest that there is another way?



Best regards,


Abhishek

03:39 PM Nov 25 2015 |

Teacher AmySuper Member!

United States

Hi,



Most people will stress the word “have” in this sentence. Typically, the vowel in “have” will be æ. However, most often you will hear hæftə instead of “have to,” and the stress will be on the first syllable of this blended word.



Hope this helps!



Best,



Amy 

01:32 PM Nov 26 2015 |

britdam007

britdam007

India

Thank you once again for the clarification! Also I’d like to know that when you don’t stress the word ‘have’ , does the pronunciation of it becomes həv ? Especially when it is used as a helping verb in a sentence? e.g. I think I have(həv ) had it. But when ‘have’ is used in the begining or in the final position of a sentence it is pronounced fully; e.g.   Have(hæv) you been to England? Oh! Yes I have(hæv).    Do you agree with me or not? Please let me know ASAP?


Best regards,


Abhishek



07:06 AM Nov 27 2015 |

Teacher AmySuper Member!

United States

Hi, 



With these examples, the pronunciation of ‘have’ will often depend on the speaker and how fast he is talking. 



After a pronoun, such as ‘I think I have had it,’ most US speakers will say the contracted form ‘I’ve.’ They will typically not speak the full word unless they want to stress ‘have’ for a specific reason. If they stress the word, it will most often be spoken hæv.



When ‘have’ is in at the beginning or end of a sentence, it will most often sound like hæv. However, if a person is speaking very quickly, it may sound like həv.



Best,



Amy

04:57 PM Nov 28 2015 |

britdam007

britdam007

India

Thank you Teacher Amy.



Cheers

03:46 PM Nov 29 2015 |